Adam Wier

ADAM WIER is Head Translator and editor. was born in Indianapolis, moved to New York City at seventeen. He earned a BA in Spanish-English Translation from Hunter College (CUNY), where he graduated summa cum laude and valedictorian. He served as the head translator for ¡Hey Yo! ¡Yo Soy! 40 Years of Nuyorican Street Poetry (2Leaf Press, 2012) and ¿What’s in a Nombre? (phati’tude, 2012), and copyedited a number of 2Leaf Press titles in both English and Spanish. He has also translated articles for the online magazine Warscapes (2013) and was one of several translators to bring Roberto Echavarren’s book, The Russian Nights (forthcoming) to English. Adam has penned three original plays produced by Haberdash Theatre, The Asexual Revolution (2007), Remember Me (2006), and Tom’s Dilemma (2008). He won a Fulbright Fellowship and relocated to Cali, Colombia to teach. He currently lives in Le Mans, France where he teaches English and translates Spanish and French to English. Adam’s book, Legends and Other Tales by Gustavo Adolfo Bécquer from the Spanish to English, is forthcoming in 2017.

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2LP Conversations

Folklore teaches its readers about culture, history, and the world around them. In doing so, it also teaches ethics. So each storyteller will render a tale in a way that she or he thinks will be not only entertaining but instructive.

Lisa Sánchez González

Gonzales’s poems speak assertively, and the poet’s use of complex periodic sentences lends his lines accumulating power. My translation closely follows the poet’s syntax, and I hope that recreates the drive of the poems.

Lynn Levin

The Black Arts Movement made it clear that you’re not just writing for yourself, but for the masses. Poetry today is more about “me” as opposed to “we.” It’s more or less an ego exercise and much of it wallows heavily in the pathos of our lives.

Abiodun Oyewole

My primary goal with this novel was to pay my respects to William Faulkner’s classic The Wild Palms. Retelling Faulkner’s tale with Latino characters seems like a natural stage of literary evolution, one that mirrors the evolving literary relationship between our twin continents.

Ezra Fitz

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